Superwrite abbreviations

Cursive script East Asia In imperial Chinaclerks used an abbreviated, highly cursive form of Chinese characters to record court proceedings and criminal confessions. These records were used to create more formal transcripts. One cornerstone of imperial court proceedings was that all confessions had to be acknowledged by the accused's signature, personal seal, or thumbprint, requiring fast writing. In Timothy Bright published his Characterie; An Arte of Shorte, Swifte and Secrete Writing by Character which introduced a system with arbitrary symbols each representing one word.

Superwrite abbreviations

I still use some of the abbreviations, as I like to take notes at staff meetings or if I am taking a class myself. I have forgotten much of it, but it sure comes in helpful. I am very grateful to have learned and remembered some of the system as It sure helped me get through college in an age where we did not have computers or smartphones; I also use it to write myself notes or if I am jotting down info from a book or article.

I am trying to find a book with this as I would love to remember more of the abbreviations. It was well worth the time I put in to learning it. It has been a long time since I heard of anyone using anything like this for superwrite abbreviations job.

I was never able to get the hang of shorthand when I took business classes. I ended up making some of my own abbreviations for common words that I would use when I was taking notes for something.

Maybe I would have had better luck using speedwriting than trying to learn shorthand. I don't remember there being any options, and always thought speedwriting and shorthand were the superwrite abbreviations thing. There would be times it might be advantageous to know some of those shortcuts when you were taking notes.

It would be much faster to underline the last letter of the superwrite abbreviations instead of writing out "ing". I don't see how this would help much with typing though. I took shorthand when I was in high school and was very fast at it.

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I was able to transcribe at words a minute. That is much faster than speedwriting. I never did use that skill in a job setting.

When I was taking notes in college I would use many of the symbols to abbreviate words. If somebody else asked to look at my notes, they had a hard time figuring them out.

I don't know how often words like this would get mixed up, but what if you needed to write a word like "meat? I am guessing there might be a symbol for short vowels or something, but by adding a symbol, the speedwriting word will have taken just as long to write as the original word.

You would run into the same problem with a lot of words that end in a silent "e. After all, it says there are over different symbols that have to be learned.

Granted, I'm sure a lot of them are only used in special situations, but it would still take a lot of work. I think the hardest problem I would have with it is remembering to only leave the long vowels. At first, I'm sure people would spend more time trying to keep track of what vowels and symbols to use than they would save using those techniques.

Like someone else mentioned, though, if you had a job where you had to take a lot of notes, I guess it would be worth the learning curve to understand the speedwriting.

The only other problem you might run into is other people not understanding what you wrote. They showed a sample of it. It was impossible to tell what any of it mean. It was basically a series of lines and shapes that were supposed to be substitutes for different words.

What I am really most curious about is how Emma Dearborn's system of speedwriting caught on. I am guessing that she probably wasn't just some random secretary sitting in an office somewhere.

Shorthand - Wikipedia

If that were the case, I doubt very many people would have seen the system in the first place. I am betting she had to be something like a professor who actually had the means to promote her new system.

That being said, I don't think I have ever seen anyone use speedwriting, but maybe that is just because I don't really know anyone who has to take a lot of notes quickly. We always keep a marker board on the refrigerator for people to leave notes to each other or as reminders. Since my mom is a nurse, though, she tends to use a lot of medical abbreviations and shorthand.

By this point, I have figured out what all of them mean, and I have actually started using some of them when I am taking my own notes.Shorthand is an abbreviated symbolic writing method that increases speed and brevity of writing as compared to longhand, a more common method of writing a leslutinsduphoenix.com process of writing in shorthand is called stenography, from the Greek stenos (narrow) and graphein (to write).

It has also been called brachygraphy, from Greek brachys (short) and tachygraphy, from Greek tachys (swift, . Nov 14,  · Spelling is handled phonetically, so silent letters are dropped and words are written with only long vowels used.

The “e” at the end of a word is dropped, for example, and a word such as “dial” would be written as “dil.” Common words such as and, the and it all have single letter or symbols for abbreviations.

superwrite abbreviations

Aug 27,  · Spelling is handled phonetically, so silent letters are dropped and words are written with only long vowels used. The “e” at the end of a word is dropped, for example, and a word such as “dial” would be written as “dil.” Common words such as and, the and it all have single letter or symbols for abbreviations.

Shorthand is an abbreviated symbolic writing method that increases speed and brevity of writing as compared to longhand, a more common method of writing a leslutinsduphoenix.com process of writing in shorthand is called stenography, from the Greek stenos (narrow) and graphein (to write).

It has also been called brachygraphy, from Greek brachys (short) and tachygraphy, from Greek tachys (swift, .

Shorthand - Wikipedia