Writing a good story endings ks1

Corbis-Bettmann Some of the most popular summer homework projects involve story writing. The Guardian Teacher Network has resources to help students of all ages to write stories at home over the summer or next term. The first step is great storytelling, especially before children's writing skills have caught up with their speaking and listening. Also find story openingsan oral activity to help pupils explore different ways to open re-tellings of familiar stories.

Writing a good story endings ks1

What makes Homer Simpson's character so rich and complex? The rules of writing I always tell students that there are no set rules for writing and they can write whatever they like. I don't subscribe to the notion that all good stories must have, for example, an attention-grabbing opening, a turning point, a twist at the end and an extended metaphor.

Incorporating these into writing doesn't automatically mean a story works, and you will read wonderful writing follows none of these rules. Pupils should be aware of what they are, of course, and why and where they might choose to use them, but it shouldn't be prescriptive.

That said, there are two rules of writing that I encourage them to follow. Not the most original rules, perhaps, but if kids can master them their writing becomes much more powerful. For "show, don't tell", I display a selection of sentences that tell the reader something and ask the pupils to rewrite them in a way that shows the writing a good story endings ks1 information.

For example, "the man was angry" could become, "the man clenched his fists and hissed beneath his breath". It's about unpacking the emotions and finding ways to let the reader see the story for themselves.

When teaching "all adverbs must die", I concentrate on the importance of giving the power to the verb. Once pupils realise the potential in this, they quickly kill adverbs and load the power of the action onto the verb.

Characterisation Not the most original method I'll wager, but this is tried and tested. Pupils divide a page in their jotter and give each quarter the headings likes, dislikes, motivations and flaws.

What makes these complex and rich characters? What makes them get out of bed every morning? What stops them from achieving their ultimate goals in life? How would they react in various situations?

writing a good story endings ks1

Once pupils have thought about these characters, I ask them to complete the page in their jotter with as many pieces of detail as they can for their own character. They swap with a partner and, using another person's character notes, write a monologue beginning with the line, "I lay away, unable to sleep, and all because…" What is this new character excited about, or scared of?

What have they done or what will they have to do? This exercise is always busy, exciting and produces promising and complex pieces of writing. Video clips There's something a bit weird about the idea of being a writer; it's a vague, wishy-washy concept for students.

They don't yet understand the hours of admin, self-promotion, editing, graft, grief and rejection that writers go through. Many pupls seem to think writers have great lives, are fabulously wealthy and sit around all day making up stories, all of which go on to be published without much bother at all.

So I always like to find video clips of writers talking about writing, sharing the pain they've gone through, their thought processes and daily routines.

If you can find video clips of a writer whose work you're using as a model or studying in class, then this can really help pupils to engage with their work.

YouTube is full of interviews with writers, recordings of book festival appearances and spoken-word performances. Being a Scottish teacher working in Scotland, I use of a suite of videos filmed and hosted by Education Scotlandwhich features a number of writers discussing their inspirations and motivations, how to create characters, how to write in genre and how to redraft.

The videos are all around five minutes long which makes them excellent starter activities; you can find them here. Narrative distance This can be modelled in class by the teacher projecting their work onto the whiteboard.

Most pupils assume that once they've chosen a narrative perspective and tense, their narrative voice will take care of itself. But with a little coaching and training, maybe we can hone their skills and abilities that much more. Narrative distance is the proximity of a reader's experience to the character's thoughts.

How close will we get? A close-up narrative would allow us to share the character's complete thought process, hear their heartbeat, feel their discomfort.

A mid-distance narrative would give us key insights into pertinent thoughts the character has, but not bother us with every detail; we would see the character going into a coffee shop and have to surmise their mood and personality by observing how they react and interact.

This is more of a film director's vantage point. And for a long-distance narrative, we only see the character from a distance — in the midst of other people, operating in a vast and complex society.3) Satisfying story endings use elements from the story's beginning and middle.

Imagine I'm writing a novel about a millionaire who is murdered in his vacation home. The main suspects are the millionaire's wife and two children, as well as the butler (of course). Scholastic's Fantasy Story Starters kids' writing activity generates fantasy and fairy tale writing prompts for children in kindergarten through sixth grade.

KS2 English Teaching Resources: Writing Effective Story Openings is a 15 slide PowerPoint presentation with accompanying worksheets. As with all our PowerPoints the presentation can be tweaked, personalised and differentiated to suit your teaching needs. Writing Guidance for Key Stage 1 KS1 children are still coming to terms with the complex task of writing.

Therefore, they may fail to pay attention to previous learning while focussing on a specific aspect of writing, e.g. using. Story endings: Story endings: Explain the result of the events or show how the problem was solved.

(But don't end with everyone going home for tea or someone waking up to find it was all a dream - . To that end, maybe giantdom is more appealing in the hands of villains than good guys; maybe the scientists should have bad intentions, but be given opportunities to do good, which they can choose to reject until something personally affects them.

Satisfying Story Endings